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Thursday, February 18, 2010

Classroom Management Tip #7: “6 Inch Voices”

In order to be successful in the classroom, you must have certain procedures that take place everyday in your classroom. One of my favorite procedures was called 6" voices. This meant that if you were speaking to anyone else in the classroom other than the teacher, you had to do so using a 6" voice. If the teacher is standing beyond 6" of the student, then the teacher should not be able to hear the student speaking. This procedure is extremely useful when students are working in groups or pairs. Failure to follow the 6" policy could mean that you would not be allowed to participate in group or pair work. From the first day of school I modeled 6" voices; I taught others what a 6" voice sounded like; and I expected to hear only 6" voices in my classroom. In the beginning of the year I would say aloud in class, “6" voices please” and encourage the students to remind each other of this expectation. After a reasonable amount of time, I had a sign that I would place within a group or pair if 6" voices were not being used; the students knew that this one and only one time warning meant either get it together or plan to do the whole assignment alone.

Students like to work together and interact verbally but can not be allowed to do so without parameters. As the teacher, you must set those parameters.

For more Classroom Management Tips go to the Classroom Management Tips Page.

2 Comments:

Paul Kibala February 23, 2017 at 7:23 PM  

Hey my girlfriend didn't believe that 6 inch voices was a real thing so i googled it and found this astute, highly informative post. Thank you for your public service in writing in such a detailed manner about an important topic. Cheers!

Paul Kibala February 23, 2017 at 7:25 PM  

Thank you for such a detailed and highly informative post about six inch voices. My girlfriend didn't believe it was a real classroom subject term. Thanks for your service to the teaching community, cheers!

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